Planet Cataloging

February 11, 2016

mashcat « mashcat

Upcoming webinars in early 2016

We’re pleased to announce that several free webinars are scheduled for the first three months of 2016. Mark your calendars!

Date/Time Speaker Title
26 January 2016 (14:00-17:00 UTC / 09:00-12:00 EST) Owen Stephens Installing OpenRefine
This webinar will be an opportunity for folks to see how OpenRefine can be installed and to get help doing so, and serves as preparation for the webinar in March.  There will also be folks at hand in the Mashcat Slack channel to assist.
Recording / Slides (pptx)
19 February 2016 (18:00-19:00 UTC / 13:00-14:00 EST) Terry Reese Evolving MarcEdit: Leveraging Semantic Data in MarcEdit.
Library metadata is currently evolving — and whether you believe this evolution will lead to a fundamental change in how Libraries manage their data (as envisioned via BibFrame) or more of an incremental change (like RDA); one thing that is clear is the merging of traditional library data and semantic data.  Over the next hour, I’d like to talk about how this process is impacting how MarcEdit is being developed, and look at some of the ways that Libraries can not just begin to embed semantic data into their bibliographic records right now — but also begin to new services around semantic data sources to improve local workflows and processes.

Joining instructions

14 March 2016 (16:00-17:30 UTC / 11:00-12:30 EST Owen Stephens (Meta)data tools: Working with OpenRefine OpenRefine is a powerful tool for analyzing, fixing, improving and enhancing data. In this session the basic functionality of OpenRefine will be introduced, demonstrating how it can be used to explore and fix data, with particular reference to the use of OpenRefine in the context of library data and metadata.

The registration link for each webinar will be communicated in advance. Many thanks to Alison Hitchens and the University of Waterloo for offering up their Adobe Connect instance to host the webinars.

by Galen Charlton at February 11, 2016 06:03 PM

February 10, 2016

Mod Librarian

10 Things on the 10th: DAM, Graph Databases, the AP and Metadata

10 Things on the 10th: DAM, Graph Databases, the AP and Metadata

Here is the first installment of the monthly 10 things on the 10th:

  1. How to choose a digital asset management (DAM) system.
  2. Complete beginner’s guide to information architecture.
  3. Getting started with graph databases.
  4. Controlled vocabulary for DAM.
  5. Coloring book pages from special collections #ColorOurCollections.
  6. From Ralph Windsor: the stages of DAM consciousness.
  7. The ASI (American Society for…

View On WordPress

February 10, 2016 12:25 PM

February 09, 2016

Metadata Matters (Diane Hillmann)

It’s not just me that’s getting old

Having just celebrated (?) another birthday at the tail end of 2015, the topics of age and change have been even more on my mind than usual. And then two events converged. First I had a chat with Ted Fons in a hallway at Midwinter, and he asked about using an older article I’d published with Karen Coyle way back in early 2007 (“Resource Description and Access (RDA): Cataloging Rules for the 20th Century”). The second thing was a message from Research Gate that reported that the article in question was easily the most popular thing I’d ever published. My big worry in terms of having Ted use that article was that RDA had experienced several sea changes in the nine (!) years since the article was published (Jan./Feb. 2007), so I cautioned Ted about using it.

Then I decided I needed to reread the article and see whether I had spoken too soon.

The historic rationale holds up very well, but it’s important to note that at the time that article was written, the JSC (now the RSC) was foundering, reluctant to make the needed changes to cut ties to AACR2. The quotes from the CC:DA illustrate how deep the frustration was at that time. There was a real turning point looming for RDA, and I’d like to believe that the article pushed a lot of people to be less conservative and more emboldened to look beyond the cataloger tradition.

In April of 2007, a mere few months from when this article came out, ALA Publishing arranged for the famous “London Meeting” that changed the course of RDA. Gordon Dunsire and I were at that meeting–in fact it was the first time we met. I didn’t even know much about him aside from his article in the same DLIB issue. As it turns out, the RDA article was elevated to the top spot, thus stealing some of his thunder, so he wasn’t very happy with me. The decision made in London to allow DCMI to participate by building the vocabularies was a game changer, and Gordon and I were named co-chairs of a Task Group to manage that process.

So as I re-read the article, I realized that the most important bits at the time are probably mostly of historical interest at this point. I think the most important takeaway is that RDA has come a very long way since 2007, and in some significant ways is now leading the pack in terms of its model and vocabulary management policies (more about that to come).

And I still like the title! …even though it’s no longer a true description of the 21st Century RDA.

by Diane Hillmann at February 09, 2016 02:19 PM

February 08, 2016

OCLC Next

Learning isn’t learning until you use it

2016-02-05 Sharon learning

The learning field is complex, thorny and ever-shifting. Decades –centuries – of intense research, policy, systems, and debate have tried to answer the question, “What is the best way to learn?” and its corollary, “What is the best way to teach?” New theories and related initiatives crop up every few years, each arriving with a bloom of new terminology intended to enlighten but destined to confuse.

This topic excites me because my WebJunction team and I think about learning a lot as we work to offer meaningful learning opportunities for library staff. With that background, I offer one word that I believe is absolutely essential to effective teaching and learning: intention.

Establishing the purpose for a learning activity can be done fairly simply, though the steps are different for learners vs. trainers.

Students: define clear, active intentions

Fight the urge to slip into passive learning habits you may have ingrained from childhood. As an adult, the only “grade” that’s important is the one you give yourself. So:

  1. Before you engage in any learning activity, ask yourself: What do I want to be able to do as a result? Your answer should not be so vague that you can’t picture it (“Do my job better”) but also not so granular (“Understand how to use the Sum function in pivot tables”) that you are missing out on the transformative potential of learning. Write your answer down. If the description of the activity includes a list of learning outcomes, review those and note how they apply to your situation.
  2. During the activity, give yourself permission to be there fully. That means doing what you need to do to ensure your learning time is uninterrupted and that you are focused.
  3. After the learning activity, ask yourself three questions and write down the answers:
    • What is one thing I learned?
    • What can I apply immediately as a result?
    • What is the next step of my learning path?
  4. Reinforce and spread your learning by telling at least one colleague about it. You can even invite your colleagues to a session where you summarize what you learned and have a discussion about it. Often these discussions surface related knowledge and skills from colleagues that will further strengthen your learning.

If you catch yourself saying, “I don’t know why I am taking this training… My boss says I should do it…I’ll never have the time to use this… I already know this stuff,” then yes, you have fallen into passive mode.

Teachers: bake intentions into your curriculum


Keeping the intentions of learning activities at the forefront will help focus your efforts.
Click To Tweet


Support the active learning of your students by making the steps listed above easier for them to do:

  1. Define practical outcomes for your content and make sure they relate to the real world of your target audience. Put these in the description of the activity.
  2. Give participants time and space to learn. For more time-intensive training programs, we ask supervisors to sign a statement to that effect.
  3. Use real-world examples from practitioners who come from the same target audience as your students. Do exercises and practice in applicable settings; templates are great for this.
  4. Allow participants to talk with each other and share what they are learning. You’ll find that learners have knowledge and experiences that you don’t—and that will enrich the learning for everyone.

Whether you’re a learner or a trainer, keeping the intentions of learning activities at the forefront will help focus your efforts.

Stand up for your own education

Comedian Louis CK has a routine where he explains how when he flies first class, he’ll often see soldiers board the plane and invariably head back to the coach section. He thinks to himself, “I should give my first class seat to this soldier. That would be such a good thing to do, it’s easy, and it would mean a lot to them.”

And then he doesn’t do it. Ever.

But, he jokes, he still congratulates himself for just thinking of the idea. Of course, his point is that kindness that is not applied has no effect. His intentions are good, for sure. But they are not actionable.

Knowledge is like that, too. If putting learning to use isn’t part of your intention, then the imparted skills will just sit there, like Louis CK… doing nothing.

The post Learning isn’t learning until you use it appeared first on OCLC Next.

by Sharon Streams at February 08, 2016 09:30 AM

Getting started with linked data

2016-02-04-Roy-linked-data

“Linked data” is a popular topic at library conferences these days, with overflow crowds wondering what it might mean for their institutions and their personal professional development. Why? Because linked data can be easily understood by computers, resulting in opportunities for improved library workflows, enhanced user experiences, and discovery of library collections through a variety of popular sites and Web services, including Google, Wikipedia and social networks.

Before briefly explaining the nuts and bolts of linked data, it is important to point out that for most libraries and librarians the sea change from records full of text strings to fully linked data elements will largely occur under your radar.

While there will likely be changes to workflows and certain operational procedures, the main changes will be absorbed by the automated systems we use and our underlying bibliographic processes. That is why OCLC has been working for years to understand the benefits and opportunities of linked data. Having said that, to best understand the opportunities offered by linked data, a basic understanding of what it is will be important.


The sea change from records full of text to linked data will occur largely under libraries' radar.
Click To Tweet


A triple by any other name

The essential concept of linked data is actually quite simple: you are stating, in a machine-understandable way, that something has a particular kind of relationship with something else. For example, in human terms you can say that the person William Shakespeare has a relationship of “author” with the work “Hamlet”:

William Shakespeare -> is the author of -> Hamlet

That relationship is known, in the world of linked data, as a “triple.”

For a machine to be able to process that information, it must be encoded in an appropriate computer language. And to be absolutely clear about which things you are linking, any string of characters (“William Shakespeare,” “is the author of” and “Hamlet” in the example above) should be replaced with a URL link that references machine descriptions of the individual elements:

http://viaf.org/viaf/96994048 (Shakespeare) -> http://schema.org/author (has an author relationship to) -> http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1154449927 (Hamlet)

This method also allows for the discovery of more information about each part of the triple, as the URLs can contain a variety of information, including relationships to other data stores.

How this relates to library data

OCLC has worked for many years to leverage the value of our massive aggregation of library bibliographic data represented by WorldCat to establish these kinds of machine-understandable relationships. We do this in a variety of ways, from creating new kinds of services like WorldCat Identities, to creating linked data for exposure to Web search engines and other uses.
OCLC Research has developed techniques for data normalization, deduplication, and enhancement that continuously improve the data aggregation that our member libraries rely upon. We produce regular statistical reports on the use of bibliographic elements that provide a view into how the profession has used its foundational standard over time. To see this, go to http://experimental.worldcat.org/marcusage/ .

Our work in linked data leads the industry in the creation of authoritative linked data entities for individuals and works. These linked data assertions are constructed not by a simple one-to-one translation from a bibliographic record to linked data, but by mining meaning from the entirety of WorldCat.

For example, all instances of William Shakespeare are aggregated and reviewed to make one canonical linked data assertion about that author. This linked data work forms a key value proposition and differentiator for our member libraries.

Here is an example of a Work record that aggregates information from all of the manifestations of that work: http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/2406166 .

The potential

In the future, we expect to provide data services to our member libraries that could include record conversion from MARC to BIBFRAME, linked data entity resolution and enhancement, and other new kinds of data services that libraries will increasingly require.

Already underway is a Person Entity Pilot project, now in its second phase, which we are using to better understand library use cases for linked data and the types of services libraries will require to support their local use of linked data resources.

By contributing your records to WorldCat, your data will be a part of this rich ecology of modern data services that will enable enhancements to your existing services as well as providing opportunities for new kinds of library services to better serve your community.

The post Getting started with linked data appeared first on OCLC Next.

by Roy Tennant at February 08, 2016 09:15 AM

Transforming data into impact

2016-02-03 Skip intro post 4

Last September, I found an interesting Forbes article, “20 Mind-Boggling Big Data Facts Everyone Must Read.” Most of them were of the “very big numbers” variety; how many billions of connected devices there are, how many photos we took on our smartphones last year, how much is being invested in big data projects, etc. I think we’ve gotten used to the idea that “big data” is really big.

The only fact on the Forbes list I found really “mind-boggling” was the last one: that of all the data collected in the world, only about half a percent is ever analyzed.

You might think this doesn’t apply to libraries. Your library may not collect user data the same way that typical “big data” commercial entities like Amazon or Google or Facebook do. Maybe that’s because of privacy issues. Maybe it’s not data you need for your operations. But there is often an ocean of data already available to libraries in other formats. You can get it from direct observation of library users. Cataloging activities. Surveys. Discussions. Website metrics. WorldCat itself is a growing collection of data about library resources, activities, locations and entities.


Of all the data collected in the world, only about half a percent is ever analyzed.
Click To Tweet


And that data may be trying to tell us something.

From data to insight

Last month at ALA Midwinter, I had the opportunity to speak to a large group of our members along with two OCLC leaders, Mary Sauer-Games and Lynn Silipigni Connaway. The topic was “Transforming data into impact,” and followed a theme of moving from data to insight and then to action in order to create impact at the library. They provided some great examples:

In these and other examples, Mary and Lynn showed how data collected both locally and through cooperative programs can have an impact on library goals. In every case, they showed how data was transformed, through insight, into action.

From insight to action

Libraries don’t collect data in order to preside over giant vaults of information for its own sake. We do it because library users are trying to accomplish things in their lives. People want to learn, to grow, to succeed. Often it’s the insight of librarians that takes the potential stored in our vast collections and helps transform it into action that changes lives.

That’s what we’ll be aiming at here on the OCLC Next blog. The insight piece of the puzzle. Taking information and providing a perspective that, hopefully, makes you think, “Yeah. That makes sense.”

Even more importantly, we hope our many authors will provide some thoughts that help you make a difference in your library, institution and community. Because while we can collect data and form an opinion on what it means, what’s next—the final step of putting that insight into action—is up to you.

I look forward to hearing about your insights.

The post Transforming data into impact appeared first on OCLC Next.

by Skip Prichard at February 08, 2016 09:00 AM

February 07, 2016

Resource Description & Access (RDA)

Date of Publication Distribution Copyright in RDA & MARC 21 Field 264 Examples

Resource Description and Access RDA

Date of Publication, Distribution, and Copyright in Resource Description and Access (RDA) Cataloging Rules & MARC 264 Examples

Table of Contents:
  • Core Element
  • How Date of Publication is defined in RDA
  • Where the Rules are for Date of Publication in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Information for Date of Publication in RDA
  • How is Date of Publication Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA)
  • Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
  • RDA Examples
  • What to do if the date on the resource is incorrect
  • Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources
  • Date of Publication not Identified in a Single-Part Resource
  • RDA Cataloging Examples of Dates
  • Supplying Dates (Date of Publication Not Identified in the Resource)
  • Importance of Supplying Probable Place and Date of Publication
  • Examples of Supplying Publication Data
  • Other RDA Examples of Dates
  • Date of Distribution
  • Where the Rules are for Date of Distribution in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Information for Date of Distribution in RDA
  • Recording Date of Distribution
  • Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
  • Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources
  • Date of Distribution Not Identified in a Single-Part Resource
  • Copyright Date
  • Coreness for Copyright Date
  • Where the Rules are for Copyright Date in RDA
  • What are the Sources of Copyright Date in RDA
  • Recording Copyright Dates
  • Other RDA Blog posts on Publication, Distribution, and Copyright Date

Core Element: Date of publication is a Core Element; If the date of publication appears on the source of information in more than one calendar, only the date in the calendar preferred by the agency preparing the description is required.

How Date of Publication is defined in RDA: A date of publication is a date associated with the publication, release, or issuing of a resource.
The date of publication is the year in which the edition, revision, etc., described in the edition area was published. If there is no edition area, the date of the first publication of the edition to which the item belongs is considered the publication date.

Where the Rules are for Date of Publication in RDA: Look at instruction 2.8.6 in RDA Toolkit

What are the Sources of Information for Date of Publication in RDA: Take dates of publication from the following sources (in order of preference):

a) the same source as the title proper (see 2.3.2.2)

b) another source within the resource itself (see 2.2.2)

c) one of the other sources of information specified under 2.2.4.

How is Date of Publication Transcribed / Recorded in Resource Description and Access (RDA): Record the date of publication applying the basic 2.8.1 instructions on recording publication statements, using the form in which it appears on the source of information.

Example:
Source: Published in 2016
264  #1   ..., $c 2016.

Apply the guidelines on capitalization, punctuation, symbols, abbreviations, etc. given under 1.7.

Per LC-PCC PS 1.8.2 (First Alternative), transcribe roman numerals for publication dates; do not convert to Arabic. If the year appears only in Roman numerals, add the year in Arabic numerals, in brackets.

Example:
Source: MMXVI
264  #1   ..., $c MMXVI [2016]

Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
  • LC-PCC PS 2.8.6.3: Add the corresponding date or dates of the Gregorian or Julian calendar if the date appearing in the resource is not of the Gregorian or Julian calendar.
Examples:

Source: 5630
264  #1   ..., $c 5630 [1869 or 1870]

Source: Heisei 1 
264  #1   ..., $c Heisei 1 [1989]

Source: anno 18
264  #1   ..., $c anno 18 [1939]

Source: Samvat 2000
264  #1   ..., $c Samvat 2000 [1943]

If the date as it appears on the resource is represented in different calendars, record the dates in the order indicated by the sequence, layout, or typography of the dates on the source of information.

Example:
Source: 4333 - 2000
264  #1   ..., $c 4333, 2000.

Resource Description and Access RDA

Question: What to do if the date on the resource is incorrect. Answer: If the date as it appears in the resource is known to be fictitious or incorrect, make a note giving the actual date

Example: Probable year of publication based on date range in which the publisher was active: Date of publication recorded as: [1969?]
  • LC-PCC PS 2.8.6.4: Record a supplied date in numerals instead of giving the chronogram. (A chronogram is a sentence or inscription in which specific letters, interpreted as numerals, stand for a particular date when rearranged). Indicate that the information was taken from a source outside the resource itself. Example: [1945]
    Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources

    RDA Rule 2.8.6.5 is for Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources

    If the first issue, part, or iteration of a multipart monograph, serial, or integrating resource is available, record the date of publication of that issue, part, or iteration, followed by a hyphen.
    Example: 1988-

    If publication of the resource has ceased or is complete and the first and last issues, parts, or iterations are available, record the dates of publication of those issues, parts, or iterations, separated by a hyphen.
    Example: 1968-1973

    If publication of the resource has ceased or is complete and the last issue, part, or iteration is available, but not the first, record the publication date of the last issue, part, or iteration, preceded by a hyphen.
    Example: -1977

    For an integrating resource, supply the date of the last update if it is considered to be important.
    Example: 1995–1998 [updated 1999] [First and last published iterations of an updating loose-leaf available; date of last update known]

    If the date of publication is the same for all issues, parts, or iterations, record only that date as the single date. Example: 1997

    If the first and/or last issue, part, or iteration is not available, supply an approximate date or dates.

    Example: [1998]- [Earliest issue available: v. 1, no. 3, July 1998]
    1997-[2000] [Last part not available but information about ending date known]
    [1988-1991] [First and last issues not available but information about beginning and ending dates known]

    If the date or dates cannot be approximated, do not record a date of publication.

    Date of Publication not Identified in a Single-Part Resource

    RDA Rule 2.8.6.6 is for Date of Publication not Identified in a Single-Part Resource

    If the date of publication is not identified in the single-part resource, supply the date or approximate date of publication. Apply the instructions in 1.9.2 on supplied dates (see p. 27).

    If an approximate date of publication for a single-part resource cannot reasonably be determined, record [date of publication not identified].

    But see the next page for important LC practice in such situations …………………
    Look at LC-PCC PS 2.8.6.6

    Supply a probable date of publication, if possible, using the guidelines below, rather than give “[date of publication not identified].”

    A. If an item lacking a publication date contains only a copyright date, apply the following in the order listed:

    1. Supply a date of publication that corresponds to the copyright date, in square brackets, if it seems reasonable to assume that date is a likely publication date.
    Example:
    Title page verso: Copyright ©2009
    Prefaced signed: June 2009
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a … $b … $c [2009]
    008/06: s
    008/07-10: 2009
    008/11-14: ####

    2. If the copyright date is for the year following the year in which the publication is received, supply a date of publication that corresponds to the copyright date.
    Example:
    Title page verso: ©2009
    Item received in: 2008
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a … $b … $c [2009]
    optionally: 264 #4 $c ©2009
    008/06: t
    008/07-10: 2009
    008/11-14: 2009

    B. If an item lacking a publication date contains a copyright date and a date of manufacture and the year is the same for both, supply a date of publication that corresponds to that date, in square brackets, if it seems reasonable to assume that date is a likely publication date.
    Example:
    Title page verso: ©1980//1980 printing
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a … $b … $c [1980]
    008/06: s
    008/07-10: 1980
    008/11-14: ####

    C. If an item lacking a publication date contains a copyright date and a date of manufacture and the years differ, supply a date of publication that corresponds to the copyright date, in square brackets, if it seems reasonable to assume that date is a likely publication date. A manufacture date may also be recorded as part of a manufacture statement if determined useful by the cataloger, or record it in MARC field 588 as a Note on issue, part, or iteration used as the basis for identification of a resource (2.20.13)
    Example:
    Title page verso: ©1978//Sixth Printing 1980
    Prefaced signed: June 1978
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a … $b … $c [1978]
    optionally: 264 #3 $a … $b … $c 1980.
    588 ## $a Description based on sixth printing, 1980.
    008/06: s
    008/07-10: 1978
    008/11-14: ####

    D. If an item contains only a date of distribution, apply the following in the order listed:
    1. Supply a date of publication that corresponds to the distribution date, in square brackets, if it seems reasonable to assume that date is a likely publication date. Also record a date of distribution as part of a distribution statement if determined useful by the cataloger.
    Example:
    Title page verso: Distributed 2008
    Bibliography includes citations to 2007 publications
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a London :$b Gay Mens Press, $c [2008]
    008/06: s
    008/07-10: 2008
    008/11-14: ####
    optionally: also give 264 #2 $a Chicago, IL : Distributed in North America by InBook/LPC Group, $c 2008

    2. If it does not seem reasonable to assume that the distribution date is a likely publication date, supply a date of publication, in square brackets, based on the information provided. Also record the distribution date as part of a distribution statement if determined useful by the cataloger.
    Example:
    Title page verso: Distributed in the USA in 1999
    Prefaced signed: London, January 1993
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a … :$b … $c [between 1993 and 1999]
    008/06: q
    008/07-10: 1993
    008/11-14: 1999

    E. If an item lacking a publication date contains only a date of manufacture, apply the following in the order listed:

    1. Supply a date of publication that corresponds to the manufacture date, in square brackets, if it seems reasonable to assume that date is a likely publication date. For books, this means that the item is assumed to be the first printing of the edition. Also record the manufacture date as part of a manufacture statement if determined useful by the cataloger.
    Example:
    Title page verso: First Printing 1980
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a … :$b … $c [1980]
    008/06: s
    008/07-10: 1980
    008/11-14: ####

    2. If the date of manufacture given implies that it is not likely the same as the date of publication, supply a date of publication, in square brackets, using the information provided. Also record the date of manufacture as part of a manufacture statement if determined useful by the cataloger, or record it in MARC field 588 as a Note on issue, part, or iteration used as the basis for identification of a resource.
    Example:
    Title page verso: 15th Impression 1980
    Date of publication: not given

    Transcription: 264 #1 $a … :$b … $c [not after 1980]
    optionally: 588 ## $a Description based on 15th impression, 1980.
    008/06: q
    008/07-10: uuuu
    008/11-14: 1980

    Supplying Dates (Date of Publication Not Identified in the Resource)
    RDA 1.9.2 shows examples of supplying dates

    Actual year known: 264 … $c [2010]

    Either one of two consecutive years: 264 … $c [2009 or 2010]

    Probable year: 264 … $c [2010?]

    Probable range of years: 264 … $c [between 2008 and 2010?]

    Earliest and/or latest possible date known:
    264 … $c [not before January 15, 2010]
    264 … $c [not before September 3, 1779]  - earliest date is known
    264 … $c [not after August 21, 1492]  - latest date is known
    264 …$c [between October 25, 1899 and February 25, 1900]  - both earliest and latest dates are known

    Importance of Supplying Probable Place and Date of Publication
    LC Policy strongly encourages you to supply a probable place of publication and a probable date of publication when this information is not on the resource. This helps with displays, and limits by place and date in OPACs. If you cannot supply this data, you will need to record Distribution data, and perhaps even Manufacture data.
    • Distribution elements are Core Elements ONLY if Publication data can not be identified. So you can save yourself the trouble of recording distribution data by supplying place and date of publication. And you can use distribution or manufacture information to help supply place and date of publication.
    As a last resort, if you have to give any distribution or manufacture information, give distribution information if present; if not, then give manufacture information. Be sure to give as complete a statement as possible.

    Examples of Supplying Publication Data

    Distribution statements are recorded in MARC field 264 #2. This need for a second MARC field is another reason why you are strongly encouraged to supply publication data if at all possible.

    These examples illustrate how supplying publication data is easier -- and perfectly acceptable:

    Example A:
    On source: ABC Publishers, 2009
    Distributed by Iverson Company, Seattle

    RDA: 264 #1 $a [Place of publication not identified] : $b ABC Publishers, $c 2009.
    264 #2 $a Seattle : $b distributed by Iverson Company, $c [2009]

    LC-Recommended: 264 #1 $a [Seattle?] : $b ABC Publishers, $c 2009.

    Example B:
    On source: On title page: Means Pub. Co., Omaha, Nebraska
    On title page verso: 2009 distribution

    RDA: 264 #1 $a Omaha, Nebraska : $b Means Pub. Co., $c [date of publication not identified]
    264 #2 $a [Place of distribution not identified]: $b [distributor not identified], $c 2009.

    LC-Recommended: 264 #1 $a Omaha, Nebraska : $b Means Pub. Co., $c [2009?]

    But sometimes distribution information must be provided when probable publisher information cannot be supplied:

    Example C:
    On jewel box: Published in 2010 in Providence; distributed in Boston and Ottawa by KL, Inc.

    RDA and LC: 264 #1 $a Providence : $b [publisher not identified], $c 2010.
    264 #2 $a Boston ; $a Ottawa : $b KL, Inc., $c [2010]

    OTHER RDA EXAMPLES OF DATES:

    Title page verso:
    First published, ALA Editions, 1955
    Reissued 1985 by Facet Publishing
    Reprint edition 2016 by Libraries Unlimited, New York
    264  #1   New York : $b Libraries Unlimited, $c 2016.

    Title page verso:
    First published in 1985  Sixth printing 1990
    264  #1  ..., $c1985.

    Title page date:  1996
    Title page verso:
    First printed, 1997
    264  #1  ...,$c 1996 [that is, 1997]

    Title page verso:
    First published in 1973
    Sixth printing 1975
    264  #1   ..., $c 1973.

    Title page verso: May 2016
    264  #1   ..., $c May 2016.

    Date of Distribution 
    Date of distribution is a Core Element for a resource in a published form if the date of publication is not identified.

    Where the Rules are for Date of Distribution in RDA: Look at instruction 2.9.6

    What are the Sources of Information for Date of Distribution in RDA: 
    Sources: Take dates of distribution from the following sources (in order of preference):
    a) the same source as the title proper (see 2.3.2.2)
    b) another source within the resource itself (see 2.2.2)
    c) one of the other sources of information specified under 2.2.4.

    For multipart monographs and serials, take the beginning and/or ending date of distribution from the first and/or last released issue or part, or from another source.

    For integrating resources, take the beginning and/or ending date of distribution from the first and/or last iteration, or from another source.

    Recording Date of Distribution
    If the date of distribution differs from the date of publication, record the date of distribution, if it is considered to be important, applying the basic instructions on recording distribution statements.

    Dates of the Non-Gregorian or Julian Calendar; Dates in the Form of Chronogram
    As with dates of publication, LC Policy Statements provide guidance in these situations.

    Multipart Monographs, Serials, and Integrating Resources
    RDA 2.8.6.5 provides guidance regarding dates in these situations.  The guidelines are similar to the guidelines for date of publication.

    Date of Distribution Not Identified in a Single-Part Resource
    • If the date of distribution is not identified in a single-part resource, supply the date or an approximate date of distribution. Apply the instructions on supplied dates given under 1.9.2. 
    • If an approximate date of distribution for a single-part resource cannot reasonably be determined, record [date of distribution not identified]. 
    • If the resource is in an unpublished form (e.g., a manuscript, a painting, a sculpture), record nothing in the date of distribution element.
    Copyright Date 

    CORENESS for LC: Give a copyright date for a single-part monograph if neither the date of publication nor the date of distribution is identified.  You are not required to record copyright dates for multipart monographs, serials, and integrating resources.
    A copyright date is a date associated with a claim of protection under copyright.

    Where the Rules are for Copyright Date in RDA:Look at instruction 2.11
      What are the Sources of Copyright Date in RDA: Take information on copyright dates from any source.

      Recording Copyright Dates
      Record copyright dates, applying the general guidelines on numbers given under 1.8.  Precede the date by the copyright symbol © or the phonogram symbol , or by “copyright” or “phonogram” if the symbol cannot be reproduced.  If the resource has multiple copyright dates that apply to various aspects (e.g., text, sound, graphics), record only the latest copyright date.

      Copyright date is recorded in MARC field 264, second indicator 4; $c is the only subfield used.

      Examples:
        264 #4 $c ©2002
      264 #4 $c ℗1983

      Source : Based on information from Library of CongressRDA Blog, OCLC and RDA Toolkit

      Author: Salman Haider
      Revised 2016-02-05 | Written 2016-02-04

      See also other RDA Blog posts on Publication, Distribution, and Copyright Date:
        
      Thanks all for your love, suggestions, testimonials, likes, +1, tweets and shares ....

      See also related posts in following RDA Blog Categories (Labels):

      by Salman Haider (noreply@blogger.com) at February 07, 2016 11:08 PM

      February 06, 2016

      First Thus

      Illegal aliens LCSH

      On 1/6/2016 6:30 PM, K.R. Roberto wrote:
      >
      > Have you heard about the push to change the LC Subject Heading for > Illegal aliens to something less
      > offensive?https://twitter.com/nonpejoratively/status/684059955419189253
      > >
      > There is going to be an ALA Council resolution at Midwinter that urges > LC to drop the term.

      It is interesting that the primary purposes of subject headings appear to be changing. It always has been based on “user needs” and “literary warrant” (http://www.itsmarc.com/crs/mergedProjects/subjhead/subjhead/Contents.htm) but now it seems there is also this idea that the heading must not be “offensive” to anyone.

      To get an idea of literary warrant of the terminology around this subject, I looked at Wikipedia and looked under the talk page of “Illegal immigration” where I found some terms. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Illegal_immigration)

      I then did a couple of quick and dirty searches in the Google n-gram tool (which searches words in books) and Google Trends (which searches words used in Google searches).

      The terms I searched were: illegal aliens, undocumented workers, undocumented immigrants, unauthorized immigrants, illegal immigrants. I was surprised that the results in the two tools are rather similar.

      In the Google n-gram result, we see that none of the terms were used until around 1940. At that time “Illegal immigrants” was used primarily until the period of the early 1970s to the early 1990s, when it was overtaken by “illegal aliens”. After that period “illegal immigrants” has again become clearly dominant. I don’t know when “Illegal aliens” became a subject heading, but if it happened during the 1970s to 1990s, this could be a reason for the heading. See: http://bit.ly/1RuzVnS

      In Google Trends we see that, except for a very short period in 2005-2006, there has been a clear predominance of “illegal immigrants” See: http://bit.ly/1OcECOJ

      In both cases, the other terms using “undocumented” or “unauthorized” are clearly less used.

      Based on this very quick analysis of literary warrant, if there is a change, the change should be from “illegal aliens” to “illegal immigrants” but I think that people would find that just as offensive.

      There was a discussion about this on Autocat awhile back (See http://bit.ly/22Mxnqt) and my own comment there. (http://blog.jweinheimer.net/2014/07/acat-aliens-as-a-subject-heading-why-is-it-considered-to-be-offensive.html)

      In any case, it seems clear to me from all of this, that the term “illegal aliens” does not offend everyone, as of course happens with racial or national epithets. It is even used in Wikipedia. As I said in my Autocat comment, “The age-old problem of choosing words that may … [offend others], may gradually disappear as linked data appears and everyone begins to worry more about adding the “correct” URI instead of the “correct” string of textual characters. I, for one, would be very happy about that. In my experience, I have discovered that almost no matter what I might say, even something like, “I love my cats” or “I like hot dogs” I have no doubt that [what] I said will make someone, somewhere, angry. Some people get offended by the very sight–or existence–of something else.”

      I shall introduce as only one bit of evidence where people get angry for almost anything, a blog post where all I mentioned was that I knew someone and I liked her a lot (http://blog.jweinheimer.net/2014/08/acat-friday-ot-science-fiction-fans-i-could-use-some-help.html). Right now, it has 41 thumbs down. Don’t know why but there they are.

      But it does show some of the problems of trying to create something that is “not offensive”. If something can offend no one, it is asking the impossible.

      James Weinheimer weinheimer.jim.l@gmail.com
      First Thus http://blog.jweinheimer.net
      First Thus Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/FirstThus
      Personal Facebook Page https://www.facebook.com/james.weinheimer.35 Google+ https://plus.google.com/u/0/+JamesWeinheimer
      Cooperative Cataloging Rules http://sites.google.com/site/opencatalogingrules/
      Cataloging Matters Podcasts http://blog.jweinheimer.net/cataloging-matters-podcasts The Library Herald http://libnews.jweinheimer.net/

      FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestShare

      by James Weinheimer at February 06, 2016 03:57 PM

      Terry's Worklog

      MarcEdit In-Process Work

      Would this be the super bowl edition? Super-duper update? I don’t know – but I am planning an update. Here’s what I’m hoping to accomplish for this update (2/7/2016):

      MarcEdit (Windows/Linux)

      · Z39.50/SRU Enhancement: Enable user defined profiles and schemas within the SRU configuration. Status: Complete

      · Z39.50/SRU Enhancement: Allow SRU searches to be completed as part of the batch tool. Status: ToDo

      · Build Links: Updating rules file and updating components to remove the last hardcode elements. Status: Complete

      · MarcValidators: Updating rules file Status: Complete

      · RDA Bug Fix: 260 conversion – rare occasions when {} are present, you may lose a character Status: Complete

      · RDA Enhancement: 260 conversion – cleaned up the code Status: Complete

      · Jump List Enhancement: Selections in the jump list remain highlighted Status: Complete

      · Script Wizard Bug Fix: Corrected error in the generator that was adding an extra “=” when using the conditional arguments. Status: Complete

      MarcEdit Linux

      · MarcEdit expects the /home/[username] to be present…when it’s not, the application data is being lost causing problems with the program. Updating this so allow the program to drop back to the application directory/shadow directory. Status: Testing

      MarcEdit OSX

      · RDA Fix [crash error when encountering invalid data] Status: Testing

      · Z39.50 Bug: Raw Queries failing Status: Complete

      · Command-line MarcEdit: Porting the Command line version of marcedit (cmarcedit). Status: Testing

      · Installer – Installer needs to be changed to allow individual installation of the GUI MarcEdit and the Command-line version of MarcEdit. These two version share the same configuration data Status: ToDo

      –tr

      by reeset at February 06, 2016 01:09 PM

      February 05, 2016

      Resource Description & Access (RDA)

      Top 10 RDA Blog Posts of 2015 on Resource Description & Access Cataloging

      RDA Blog

      This was the fourth year of RDA Blog on Resource Description and Access (RDA).  We hope that our posts have been both interesting and helpful to all librarians and catalogers. As 2015 comes to a close, I want to share our most read articles of the year.

      Top 10 RDA Blog Posts of 2015 

      1. RDA Cataloging Rules for Pseudonyms with MARC 21 Examples
      2. International Standard Book Number (ISBN) - MARC to RDA Mapping
      3. RDA Cataloging Examples
      4. Articles, Books, Presentations on Resource Description and Access (RDA)
      5. Establishing Certain Entities in the Name or Subject Authority File : RDA Cataloging
      6. Libhub Initiative
      7. Corrected Titles Proper & Variant Titles : RDA vs AACR2 : Questions and Answers & Best Practices
      8. RDA Bibliography
      9. LC RDA Implementation of Relationship Designators in Bibliographic Records
      10. 33X fields do not necessarily mean RDA
      Thank you for reading RDA Blog on Resource Description and Access (RDA)! Happy New Year, friends!

      Resource Description and Access


      by Salman Haider (noreply@blogger.com) at February 05, 2016 02:39 PM

      February 04, 2016

      Mod Librarian

      One Thing Thursday: How did the Most Beautiful Library in America get Demolished?

      One Thing Thursday: How did the Most Beautiful Library in America get Demolished?

      Here is one thing for this week:

      1. How did the most beautiful library in America get demolished?

      Also, dear friends and readers – I am a little burnt out on the five things a week format of this blog. I welcome suggestions for content and format alike. How about 10 things on the 10th – a monthly offering? Or 20 things on the 20th?

      Thanks for understanding while I take some time to sort out the best…

      View On WordPress

      February 04, 2016 12:45 PM

      Resource Description & Access (RDA)

      RDA - Production Publication Distribution Manufacture Date - MARC 264

      RDA - Production Publication Distribution Manufacture Date - MARC 264

      MARC field 264 (formerly known as the publication, distribution, field in AACR2) is the home for many different RDA elements.  MARC field 264 will replace field 260 so that each of the different types can be coded explicitly. We will talk about the following areas:

      • Production statement (2.7)
      • Publication statement (2.8)
      • Distribution statement (2.9)
      • Manufacture statement (2.10)
      • Copyright date (2.11)
      [Source: Library of Congress]

      Please note that relevant rules are available in RDA RULES-CHAPTER 2

      Some popular RDA Blog posts on PUBLICATION DISTRIBUTION ETC.MARC-260MARC-264, and DATE using guidelines from RDA RULES-CHAPTER 2 are following:
      Bookmark this RDA Blog post for important links to Resource Description and Access and AACR2 Cataloging Rules and Examples on PUBLICATION PRODUCTION MANUFACTURE DISTRIBUTION ETC.MARC-260MARC-264, and DATE applying guidelines from RDA RULES-CHAPTER 2 and LC-PCC PS.
        
      Thanks all for your love, suggestions, testimonials, likes, +1, tweets and shares ....

      See also related posts in following RDA Blog Categories (Labels):

      by Salman Haider (noreply@blogger.com) at February 04, 2016 10:23 AM

      February 03, 2016

      First Thus

      ACAT Latin America versus South America

      On 03/02/2016 13.36, Bughdana Hajjar wrote:
      > Dear autocatters,I received an email from our reference librarian asking about the difference in usage between latin America and South America?Would you help?Regards,
      See the LC Subject Heading manual H985 for Latin America http://www.loc.gov/aba/publications/FreeSHM/H0985.pdf “1. Latin America

      Assign the heading Latin America to works dealing collectively with the area and/or countries south of the Rio Grande, as well as all or parts of three or more of the regions that make up Latin America, that is, Mexico, Central America, South America, and the West Indies.

      Also assign Latin America as the collective geographic heading and subdivision for the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America.”

      South America is the continent.

      FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestShare

      by James Weinheimer at February 03, 2016 01:12 PM

      January 31, 2016

      First Thus

      My First Attempt at Research: Looking It Up in Your Funk and Wagnall’s

      My First Attempt at Research:
      Looking It Up in Your Funk and Wagnall’s

      I want to recommend an excerpt from a highly enjoyable article in Harper’s Magazine by John Crowley, who is describing the Encyclopaedia Britannica and how he used it as a boy.

      Easy Chair — From the February 2016 issue

      Rule, Britannica By John Crowley

      […] I tried to learn about sex from the E.B. [i.e. Encyclopaedia Britannica] The daring I felt in even looking up the topic in secret filled me with a weird elation and, yes, a kind of heat. The article, though, was entirely devoted to sexual differentiation in various plants and animals, with elaborate tables of X and Y chromosomes. “Reproductive System, Anatomy of” featured an old “transverse section” of a sheep’s prostate and a diagram of a testicle revealing a worm’s nest of seminiferous tubules inside, a view I could not relate to my own or to anything else.

      This reminds me of my own boyhood encounters with encyclopedias. Life was different from what we know today and I believe it is difficult for many even to imagine how much things we take for granted have changed. One obvious instance is the use of the word “f**k,” which now can be found even in popular newspapers and magazines, and on the web it is almost everywhere. I still find it too uncomfortable to write it publicly, although I confess I do use it in speech. In its modern use, “f**k” has taken on some rather strange spellings and forms.NOTE

      In those days, the word was rarely used and almost never printed, except in adult publications that I couldn’t know about. You didn’t hear the word spoken on radio, TV, or in the movies. I remember coming across it only on, shall I say, special occasions.

      The major occasions I would see it was during our Sunday afternoon drives. The Sunday drive was the norm before air conditioning came into wide use and when we lived in the heat of New Mexico, my whole family looked forward to the Sunday afternoon drive. We could roll down all the car windows, my father would “open it up” on the highway, and we could all cool off. One invariable part of the drive was when my father would go through an underpass, located next to Escondida, New Mexico, the next town over.

      On the wall of the underpass was written the word “f**k,” and when we approached the underpass I would start to watch for it. My mother was completely appalled and wanted my father to go home a different way but I think he liked seeing it and he always drove through that underpass on the way home. But it is just as possible that he simply liked aggravating my mother and wanted to give his sons a thrill. Sometimes he would drive through so fast that I would miss the word and I would have to wait a whole week before I had the chance to see it again. I think he did that on purpose.

      The very first time I saw that word however is quite vivid in my memory. It happened when I was playing in the desert and went to play next to some railroad tracks. Someone had written F**K in capital letters on an old, dried-out trestle, using gum. I found it fascinating and when I got home, I told my mother what I had found and asked what it meant. She looked at me and said that if I EVER said that word again, she would wash my mouth out with soap. So, I never said it in front of her or any adult. To be honest, while the kids cussed constantly, I don’t remember that we used that word so much. The few times you did, you would whisper it and everyone would giggle.

      While you could hear lots of adults (including my father) on the street punctuating their speech with plenty of swear words like “shits” and “craps” and “goddamns,” you heard “f**k” very rarely in public. As a result, that particular word held a certain power that we don’t feel today.

      I remember that several times afterwards I returned to the railroad trestle to stare at that word as the gum slowly deteriorated in the sun.

      Yet, none of that lessened my curiosity in what the word itself meant, and the word led me into my very first foray into what I would later realize was genuine research. Just like John Crowley’s experience with the Britannica, I too was intensely interested in sex and wanted to know what all the fuss was about.

      The other boys seemed to know everything about it already and I had learned from experience that it was unwise to look too stupid in front of them. I had already learned that I couldn’t ask my mother. If I asked my brother, I knew he would never let me forget it and he would turn me into a laughing-stock with all of his friends, and I just couldn’t find it in myself to ask my dad. I never considered asking any of the girls I knew. At that time I considered girls a completely separate species. Teachers or librarians? They were hardly recognizable life forms.

      And yet, I knew there was an answer and I could even see it and hold it: the font of all knowledge was right in our own home. The Funk and Wagnall’s Encyclopedia. We didn’t have the Brittanica.

      Funk & Wagnall'sFrom http://www.amazon.com/Wagnalls-Standard-Reference-Encyclopedia-entire/dp/B000CF2BFK

      My parents got it through a promotion in one of the grocery stores where my father worked. You would sign up and every month or so you could buy a new volume. Our set had been complete for awhile, and I looked upon it as holding all the knowledge in the world. Therefore, the information I wanted had to be in there–the problem was, how could I find it? It was huge! There were 25 volumes!

      The only times I had used it before was to look up things I already knew, terms such as “dog” and “cat” where I enjoyed looking at all the different kinds of dogs and cats. This seemed to be a task that was altogether different. How should I start?

      I figured that you start by looking up something.

      But how? What?

      For younger people who may be reading this, they may be puzzled that I did not search the full text of the electronic version of the Funk and Wagnall’s Encyclopedia using a boolean search query. Or why I didn’t use the text and pictures on CD-ROM, DVD, a pen drive or any other hard drive. Or why I didn’t download it from the Internet Archive or Google Books or use a p2p file sharing program such as Bit Torrent. Or why I didn’t buy it for my Kindle, smart phone, tablet, smartWatch, Google Glasses or Oculus Rift. I didn’t do it because none of things existed. One other point may seem rather strange: the fact that I couldn’t do any of that did not bother me in the slightest because all of those things were beyond my imagination. Times are different now and if put in the same situation, I would find it intolerable.

      As I confronted that huge Funk and Wagnall’s, I started with the word I knew: f**k. Even before I began, I had serious reservations whether I would find it and this dampened my enthusiasm somewhat, but nevertheless, I thought it was worth a try.

      Sure enough, it wasn’t there. That word, that incredible word that everyone treated with such power and awe, turned out to be entirely worthless.

      So I turned to another word that I knew:

      Sex.

      That word, of course, was there but I was to be disappointed because what I found was hardly exciting. In fact, what I found was decidedly uninteresting, similar to what James Crowley found in the Harper’s article, and certainly not what I wanted. Like him, I too had felt daring and excited when I started, but this was a sad letdown. I wanted much more.

      At this point, I do not remember the exact trail of the terminology I followed; I only remember that it took some time. My method was: I would look up something that I thought would be interesting, discover it was uninteresting, but I would find words I did not know and I would look those up. Considering my actions from an adult, librarian vantage-point, I cannot question my method, since it appears I did everything right. I think that my diligence and endurance were actually praiseworthy.

      But none of that worked. Every word turned out to be a dead end. Every single one. I remember I gave up a couple of times but something would spur me on and I would once again begin to look for it…. always with no results. I believe there were a couple of reasons why I didn’t give up completely. One was, naturally, a young boy’s normal interest in such matters. But the other was that I knew the encyclopedia we owned held all the knowledge in the world–so the information I wanted absolutely HAD to be in there. Somewhere, it was right in front of me, in that shelf and a half of books!

      To say it was frustrating does not begin to describe how I felt. I remember considering whether I should start with volume 1 and slog my way through, but decided that was not an option. What could I do?

      There was a boy who was one of my best friends, and our families would have each other over for dinner occasionally. His family had a complete set of the Encyclopaedia Britannica and it was twice as big as our set of encyclopedias. I thought I could maybe find what I wanted there when we visited his house, but somehow it never worked out. It would be time for dinner, or my friend wanted to play, or everybody wanted to watch TV, and the TV turned out to be right next to the Encyclopaedia Brittanica, and I knew that if I picked out a volume somebody would ask what I was looking for.

      I couldn’t allow that to happen. Stuck again.

      Anyway, it took time to find what I wanted. I don’t remember how long it took but at the time it seemed forever. Looking back, it obviously took days if not weeks, but in the end I did find what I was looking for. It turned out I was right. The information really was there. It was under a word I had never heard of in my life: Coitus. I remember reading the text under that entry and thinking “Oh!”.

      Even in my early years however, I displayed a trait that could be considered as either good or bad, but it would continue to dog me throughout the years, and still dogs me to this very day: I couldn’t believe what I had read. As I considered what I had found under “coitus,” it seemed too outrageous to me and I wanted supporting evidence.

      Unfortunately, I was to discover that if finding the word “coitus” had been hard, then getting supporting evidence turned out to be impossible. I figured I had gotten everything I could out of that Funk and Wagnall’s that had tormented me for so long and I could safely ignore it, but ignoring the Funk and Wagnall’s meant I would have to look somewhere else. Where? It meant starting all over again, and I still couldn’t ask anybody. I figured that if I told someone my doubts and I was wrong, I would only make myself look more ridiculous than ever!

      From the very beginning of what was to be my very first research project, I had my suspicions that adults talked about “it” a lot but used some sort of secret language among themselves that was unknown to me. With this in mind, I began to pay much more attention to what adults said that I had dismissed previously–those times when the adults would laugh uproariously for reasons I couldn’t fathom, or when some adult would say something I didn’t understand, another would say “Wait a second,” make a motion toward me and then all the adults would look at me with strange looks on their faces. Earlier, I had simply dismissed all this as strange, adult stuff, but I began to listen in the hope of getting some of my supporting evidence.

      None of that worked very well and it turned out that instead of getting any genuine supporting evidence, I had to settle for what I would later learn was “preponderance of evidence,” which even back then I recognized as a much lower standard. From my own interpretations of what the adults were saying, I decided that the majority of the evidence seemed to lean more in favor of the coitus theory, as opposed to it.

      And there the matter lay until I grew older and I finally found the supporting evidence I needed.


      NOTE: (See for example A Glossary of 69 F**ks / by Rufus Lodge, Esquire Sep 2, 2014)

      FacebookTwitterGoogle+PinterestShare

      by James Weinheimer at January 31, 2016 02:47 PM

      Lorcan Dempsey's weblog

      The facilitated collection

      Collections have been central to library identity – we have discussed how library collections are changing in a network environment elsewhere (Collection Directions: The Evolution of Library Collections and Collecting – PDF). Support for the discovery, curation and creation of resources in research and learning practices continues to evolve. In this blog entry I discuss … Continue reading The facilitated collection

      The post The facilitated collection appeared first on Lorcan Dempsey's Weblog.

      by dempsey at January 31, 2016 01:38 AM